Are American Bullies Outside Dogs? 5 American Bully Facts


american bully looking smart

My love for American Bullies started only just a few years ago. I met an American Bully while out for a walk with my Staffy once, and ever since have been fascinated. The American Bully has a very formidable stance, but one of the sweetest temperaments imaginable. American Bullies appear to be able to handle most anything, but are they outside dogs?

Are American Bullies outside dogs? As a whole the American Bully is not well suited to live outside. The thin, short coat of American Bullies makes them very sensitive to both cold and hot weather. American Bullies are also first and foremost companion pets made to live indoors with their family.

Since bringing home my American Bully puppy a few short months ago I can confirm these dogs are not meant to live outside. My American Bully puppy does not enjoy temperatures on the low or high end and much prefers being inside next to me and my Staffy.

In this post I will cover a few of the reasons why American Bullies are not outside dogs, as well as some safety precautions when it comes to the weather. Let’s dig in!

Can An American Bully Live Outside?

In a very mild climate with little variation in temperature changes an American Bully could technically live outside. Though this would be far from ideal for the dog. When you are considering getting a dog that would be an outside dog, the American Bully is not right for you.

Even in the mild temperatures my American Bully would not choose to live outside. He does enjoy lounging on the patio and watching the world go by, so long as the door remains open. He must feel free to come and go inside as he pleases.

The American Bully is a very family oriented dog. They crave the attention and affection of their humans. Spending the majority of their time separated from the pack and alone outside will lead to behavioral problems and result in an unbalanced dog. 

Do American Bullies Have Separation Anxiety?

american bully sad face

American Bullies as a whole can be prone to separation anxiety. Especially when some of their essential needs like exercise, mental stimulation, and training are not being fulfilled. Keeping an American Bully as an outside dog can lead to separation anxiety, and result in unwanted behavioral issues.

The American Bully thrives on interaction and affection from the family. Being left alone in the home, or made to live outside can trigger anxious behavior and stress in your dog. Keeping you American Bully as an inside dog rather than outside is one crucial way to avoid behavior issues from developing.

When your American Bully begins to develop separation anxiety within the home there are a few ways to correct this behavior. I have written a very extensive article on how to manage American Bullies with separation anxiety, as well as proactively prevent it from starting. Check out my post “Can American Bullies Be Left Alone? 7 Tips For Anxiety” to learn in greater detail how you can help an American Bully with separation anxiety.

Related ArticleCan American Bullies Be Left Alone? 7 Tips For Anxiety

Do American Bullies Get Cold? How Cold Is Too Cold?

American Bullies have a very short, thin coat and as a general rule get cold easily. Factors such as age, health, and activity level will play a role in how quickly your American Bully will feel the effects of cold weather. A young, healthy and active dog will handle cold weather much better.

When temperatures drop to around 45° F/7°C an American Bully will begin to feel a bit uncomfortable. Once the temperature drops to the freezing mark you will need to take extra precautions to ensure your American Bully can stay relatively warm in the cold weather.

Cold weather that reaches down to the 0° F/-17°C level will begin to be too cold for your American Bully to be outside without at least a sweater on. Frostbite and hypothermia can become a serious problem when temperatures reach these levels. 

It is crucial to monitor your American Bully when outside in this type of cold weather. Things like skin that is cold to touch, swollen or red skin, as well as a pale complexion are signs of frostbite that should be treated immediately.

Prolonged exposure to cold can also lead to hypothermia and cause major health problems for your American Bully. Signs of fatigue, weakness, and lack of alertness are early signs and you should be getting your dog inside to warm up immediately.


Each dog will handle cold weather differently so it is important to keep a close eye on your American Bully. Signs such as shivering, lack of energy, and general discomfort are signs your dog has had enough and needs to go inside.

Resources & ReviewsBest Winter Coats & Jackets For Dogs

Can American Bullies Be In The Snow?

american bully outside in snow

There is no problem with an American Bully being in the snow. American Bullies love being in the snow and can play for as long as they feel comfortable. Watch for signs that your dog is becoming too cold, and avoid areas with hard, compact snow that may hurt or injure their feet, face, or belly.

My American Bully puppy loved playing in the snow when I first brought him some in the very early Spring. He would prance, play, eat, and zoom around the snow each morning we went for his potty break. Snow is very interesting to dogs, and for a puppy it is wonderful mental stimulation.

The various smells, textures, and cool temperature of snow makes for a fascinating environment. Be mindful of your surroundings. Avoid letting your American Bully dive into unknown snow banks just in case there are hard or sharp objects buried below. Otherwise just watch for signs of being too cold and let them have fun until they need to head inside and warm up.

Do American Bullies Overheat? How Hot Is Too Hot?

american bully smiling

American Bullies as a whole are not very efficient at regulating heat and will overheat in warm weather easily. When temperatures reach 85° F/30°C it is best to keep your American Bully indoors as much as possible. Avoid strenuous exercise of any kind during hot weather.

We have been experiencing a hotter than usual summer where I live. As a result I have had to take extra precautions with my American Bully puppy in order to keep him cool and avoid overheating

Normally I like to exercise my American Bully a few times a day. Morning, afternoon, early evening and before bed. When the weather is too hot we have to make adjustments and keep our afternoon and early evening walks short and shady.

Typically during those hot days I will walk my American Bully early in the morning and later at night to avoid the peak hot temperatures. These cooler times of the day ensure he is getting his exercise and avoids overheating.

While inside I keep a fan next to his crate and in the living room. My American Bully loves to lay on the cool floor and have the fan blow on his belly. I also like to keep cold snacks like pupsicles and ice cubes for him as a nice cool treat.

A precaution worth mentioning is to never give your dog ice cubes or cold treats if they are experiencing heat stroke symptoms. This can cause problems with a sudden shock to their system. Instead cool their body with water and contact your vet immediately.

Final Thoughts

American Bullies are not meant to be kept outside, away from the family. These dogs were specifically bred to be loving and loyal family companions. An American Bully left to live outside on their own is like a fish out of water, and not something I would recommend as an owner.

Aside from the strong bond American Bullies have with their family, they are also prone to cold and overheating. Keeping an American Bully outside in the cold weather or heat is not something they can physically handle. It can be dangerous, or even fatal in extreme cases.

The American Bully might not be the right dog for you if you are looking to keep a dog outside. These dogs need to be next to their family and kept at a comfortable temperature. American Bullies make great inside dogs. They are calm, relaxed, and loving family friends, and need to be by your side.

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